Westerns Whales and Oceans blog

The Rights of Nature Movement is Gaining Ground!

I have always thought of the Rights of Nature movement requiring shovels and hardhats and planting trees and fending off helicopters from chasing wild horses and things like that. Maybe getting arrested for defending prairie dogs.

Recently the GARN (Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature) organization met in Italy to get input on the “constitution” they are proposing. I was part of this…even though I wasn’t in Italy. Dang it. I didn’t know about the event until the day before it happened. However, I did tune in via ZOOM and my cell phone.

As I’ve previously mentioned, my attention is slowly fading from actively publishing to adopting the Rights of Nature movement. This is quite a challenge since there is no established “HUB” for the Rights of Nature here in North America even though GARN said there was. No matter. I decided to start my own ‘hub.” I hoped this attempt would be more successful than the “JUST ONE THING” movement my staff and I tried half-assedly to launch.

“Saving Our Oceans” was my biggest attempt to promote the Rights of Nature and I got so discouraged I took the book out of circulation.

So imagine my excitement when I quite by accident flipped the TV channel a week ago and landed on a 60 Minutes segment that was doing a feature piece on a fantastic movement in Montana designed to “return nature to nature.” The American Prairie organization is buying property as it becomes available to foster the return of bison, deer, bears, wolves – basically all animals – that used to roam freely in the area by “rewilding” the area. Their intent is to have a space of land that is 5000 square miles in size…roughly 3.2 million acres.

The organization is working with “Nonprofits, Indigenous Communities, neighbors, local communities, federal and state land managers and prairie enthusiasts from around the globe.” I urge you to check this out. Https://www.AmericanPrairie.org

However, after I mailed my check to American Prairie, I came to realize that I have in fact been very involved in the Rights of Nature movement – I just wasn’t really conscious of it until the American Prairie had my attention. I have always thought of the Rights of Nature movement requiring shovels and hardhats and planting trees and fending off helicopters from chasing wild horses and things like that. Maybe getting arrested for defending prairie dogs.

For starters, the Save Our Wild Salmon Alliance has long held my attention, interest, and donations. I also write letters to officials as requested basically asking them to get off their asses and do something helpful for the diminishing native king salmon population.

I went to the effort to become a Certified Marine Naturalist to work with the Whale Museum (and whales). I have also closely followed and donated to the NRDC (Nature Resource Defense Counsel). And I’ve promoted the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDEF) which is an organization that helps communities take on big biz and the govt. to stop developments that destroy natural resources and nature in general. I just never thought of these activities as being a type of Rights of Nature activity. So now I don’t feel like I’m just spinning my wheels anymore!

Basically, while there may be no official “hub” for the Rights of Nature yet in North America, I can see that a lot of people besides me actually care and support the Rights of Nature movement but just don’t know that’s what they’re doing.

Not very successful…but not stressed

And I finished my third Colin Fletcher book, The Secret Worlds of Colin Fletcher. I am a bit sad that I can’t carry a 60 pound backpack and walk for 20 miles a day. Seriously. Anymore I can’t find a pair of shoes that work for me, and I’ve got a closet full of them!

At this point, despite my good intentions, I’d have to say I’ve not been very successful this summer with my lofty, well intentioned goals and ideas. It’s weird because I don’t really care.

For starters, I couldn’t resist reading the Fox and NYT apps on my cell phone almost every day despite my firm commitment not to do so. It’s such a bad habit. In some ways it was depressing to see that things weren’t changing for the better…but it was even more depressing to see change for the worse. I refer primarily to the free-for-all shootings, both here and in Ukraine. Not that I’m gun free. And hysteria and hatred were at an all time high, in the media anyway.

But I’ve read some great books! For starters, Stay off my Operating Table, written by heart surgeon Philip Ovadia, was most interesting, especially his steak diet – that won’t work for my budget. But perhaps even more interesting and helpful was A Statin free Life, by Dr. Aseem Malhotra, a highly respected cardiologist. I loved this guy’s diet advice. SOO DOABLE! And finally I read Live it not Diet, by Mike Sheridean. This book was a bit too restrictive for me for the long haul, but it was worthwhile reading. I tried his diet plan for a week, but I was sabotaged by my husband when he made his own recipe of coconut oatmeal cookies. I got into these books because the quack doctor I’ve seen twice now tried to insist I go on statins. I refused. I’m looking for a doctor now who agrees with me.

I also read the rivoting The Hidden Life of Trees, by Peter Wohlleben. If you think I’m being sarcastic, I’m not. I will admit, though, that I could only read one chapter at a time because I really found it necessary to actually go look at trees after each chapter to really see and experience what he was talking about. Fascinating! Trees are amazing when you know how smart they are!

Resting on a 5-mile hike

And I finished my third Colin Fletcher book, The Secret Worlds of Colin Fletcher. I am a bit sad that I can’t carry a 60 pound backpack and walk for 20 miles a day. Seriously. Anymore I can’t find a pair of shoes that work for me, and I’ve got a closet full of them!

And I read some great John Sandford books and some gory murder/detective books. That was fun.

But, I just can’t get into the meditation stuff. Every time I try to meditate I fall asleep.

As for the business…it’s languished. I have been giving out the Saving Our Oceans book, however. Sometimes I leave a copy in those swap boxes. I have had some book orders which is always a challenge when I’m on a boat.

As for the cruising world where I currently am…very very few boats out and about. In the 40 years we’ve been boating, I’ve never seen so few vessels. In some ways it was really nice…in other ways it was kind of eerie to travel all day and not see another boat! Fuel is the big issue obviously. Anyway, we’ll be going into drydock August 10th and will be back in Arizona in early September. I’ll be happy to be home, no matter how hot it is in Arizona.

The author of “the old lady” book assures me it’s almost finished. She says she has completely changed the plot, but is much happier with it. I’d just be happy to see it after waiting almost three years. I’m suspicious at this point.

No updates on orcas other than a few orca babies have been born this year. Salmon are still waiting in limbo for someone to get the kahunas to tear down dams so they don’t become extinct. No one believes in the rights of nature, I guess. And some very stupid people still think that whales belong in swimming pools.

Stay free…free from covid, monkey pox and things that scare you.

Back on the water again…and don’t buy an electric car

But mostly I want to hike and row, and fish and read without a gazillion thoughts rushing around in my head. I think that’s maybe like trying to be in the mysterious NOW zone.

To escape the torrid heat in Arizona, we made our yearly trek to Anacortes Washington, last month. Well, it’s sure as hell not hot here. The thermometer hasn’t made it out of the 50s yet. And it’s not just cold, but windy, and rainy, and did I say cold? Periodically a bit of sun teases us and gets our hopes up.

I’m sure the boat appreciated our return, and it looked as good as when we left last October. It didn’t seem to have any trauma or damage from the exceptionally cold, snowy, rainy, windy winter here.

The plan is to leave port when the weather is more inviting and head north for three months. I hope to get photos of orcas and find Cookie, the whale I adopted. Plus, continuing with my seaweed identification and paintings booklet is high on my to-do list. I’ll also be giving out copies of Saving Our Oceans to libraries and random people I see reading. In fact, I also want to put Saving into ebook format.

Next, I hope to get some editing/work done on the book about the runaway 70-year-old woman that we’ll release – if the book ever gets finished and we get lucky!

Then, for my sanity I need to take a vacation from my cell phone. I just don’t think doing so will be too difficult. Somehow my phone number got shared with every telemarketing service in the entire world. I no longer answer the slippery contraption. If you want to talk to me, please leave a message and I’ll return your call. Plus, the news has become too unbearable to read more than once a week. I don’t do the social media stuff like Facebutt. Once in a great while (like twice a year) some unknown energy makes me tweet.

But mostly I want to hike and row, and fish and read without a gazillion thoughts rushing around in my head. I think that’s maybe like trying to be in the NOW. I need to calm down, PERIOD.

I’ll stay in touch. Meanwhile, don’t buy an electric car. See my last blog! Digging for all the needed metals will ruin huge swaths of earth.

Stay safe and keep warm!

Electric Cars are NOT the Answer

A typical EV battery weighs one thousand pounds, about the size of a travel trunk. It contains twenty-five pounds of lithium, sixty pounds of nickel, 44 pounds of manganese, 30 pounds cobalt, 200 pounds of copper, and 400 pounds of aluminum, steel, and plastic. Inside are over 6,000 individual lithium-ion cells.

Thinking about purchasing an electric car so you won’t feel guilty about your battery run car contributing to climate change, air pollution, etc. etc. etc. Better think again about your choice. Recently I received an email with the following information. I have edited this to its bare bones. If you’d like to see the entire article let me know.

“What is a battery?’ I think Nicholas Tesla said it best when he called it an Energy Storage System. That’s an important distinction.

They do not make electricity – they store electricity produced elsewhere, primarily by coal, uranium, natural gas-powered plants, or diesel-fueled generators.  So, to say an EV is a zero-emission vehicle is not at all valid.

Also, since forty percent of the electricity generated in the U.S. is from coal-fired plants, it follows that forty percent of the EVs on the road are coal-powered, do you see?

But that is not half of it.  For those of you excited about electric cars and a green revolution, I want you to take a closer look at batteries and also windmills and solar panels. These three technologies share what we call environmentally destructive embedded costs.

A typical EV battery weighs one thousand pounds, about the size of a travel trunk.  It contains twenty-five pounds of lithium, sixty pounds of nickel, 44 pounds of manganese, 30 pounds cobalt, 200 pounds of copper, and 400 pounds of aluminum, steel, and plastic. Inside are over 6,000 individual lithium-ion cells.

It should concern you that all those toxic components come from mining. For instance, to manufacture each EV auto battery, you must process 25,000 pounds of brine for the lithium, 30,000 pounds of ore for the cobalt, 5,000 pounds of ore for the nickel, and 25,000 pounds of ore for copper. All told, you dig up 500,000 pounds of the earth’s crust for just  one  battery.

Sixty-eight percent of the world’s cobalt, a significant part of a battery, comes from the Congo. Their mines have no pollution controls, and they employ children who die from handling this toxic material. Should we factor in these diseased kids as part of the cost of driving an electric car?”

I’d like to leave you with these thoughts. California is building the largest battery in the world near San Francisco, and they intend to power it from solar panels and windmills. They claim this is the ultimate in being ‘green,’ but it is not! This construction project is creating an environmental disaster. Let me tell you why.

The main problem with solar arrays is the chemicals needed to process silicate into the silicon used in the panels. To make pure enough silicon requires processing it with hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, nitric acid, hydrogen fluoride, trichloroethane, and acetone. In addition, they also need gallium, arsenide, copper-indium-gallium- diselenide, and cadmium-telluride, which also are highly toxic. Silicone dust is a hazard to the workers, and the panels cannot be recycled.

Wind farm in Navarre, Spain at sunset. Renewable energy concept.

Windmills are the ultimate in embedded costs and environmental destruction. Each weighs 1688 tons (the equivalent of 23 houses) and contains 1300 tons of concrete, 295 tons of steel, 48 tons of iron, 24 tons of fiberglass, and the hard to extract rare earths neodymium, praseodymium, and dysprosium. Each blade weighs 81,000 pounds and will last 15 to 20 years, at which time it must be replaced. We cannot recycle used blades. Sadly, both solar arrays and windmills kill birds, bats, sea life, and migratory insects.

There may be a place for these technologies, but you must look beyond the myth of zero emissions. I predict EVs and windmills will be abandoned once the embedded environmental costs of making and replacing them become apparent.  “Going Green” may sound like the Utopian ideal and are easily espoused, catchy buzzwords, but when you look at the hidden and embedded costs realistically with an open mind, you can see that Going Green is more destructive to the Earth’s environment than meets the eye, for sure.”

If this had been titled : “The Embedded Costs of Going Green,” would you have read it?  Please share if you wish.

“Death in the Desert” Controversy

Leery, but trusting that the criminals “disguised” by name in the book would never read it, we went forward with publication. And now, with the southern border being overrun with illegal immigrants and criminals of the worst kind, we felt it was past time to give this “Death in the Desert” some serious attention.

There is no doubt that the most controversial book Moonlight Mesa has published is “Death in the Desert,” by R.L. Coffield.

“Death in the Desert” is the third book in the Benjamin Thomas trilogy. And while it was the most controversial of the three books, the award-winning first book, “Northern Escape” was possibly the most popular. As for the second book in the series…well, it’s a long story, but it ends well.

Las Vegas Detective Ben Thomas, Alaska Game Warden Chole Littlebird, outlaw Roy Biers, and the duped, young Max Jessee are the main characters in the “Northern Escape,” which opens and closes in Las Vegas, but primarily takes place in Southeast Alaska. The crime? A two-million dollar heist from a casino in Las Vegas which leads Detective Ben Thomas to Alaska where he’s certain young Max Jessee has fled.

“Death in the Desert,” however, introduces the reader to a host of actual criminals whose names the author changed for obvious reasons. Besides Ben Thomas and Chole Littlebird, the author introduces a highly appealing new character, Jake Starr, a U.S. Marshall. In addition to finally solving the mystery that ends “Northern Escape,” “Death in the Desert” is one of the most revealing, brutal, masterful depictions of the criminal elements involved in the drug and human trafficking trade that occurs daily on the U.S. southern border. The book is definitely not for the queasy.

Leery, but trusting that the criminals “disguised” by name in the book would never read it, we went forward with publication. And now, with the southern border being overrun with illegal immigrants and criminals of the worst kind, we felt it was past time to give this “Death in the Desert” some serious attention.

As for the second, delayed, book in the series, “Northern Conspiracy,” we hesitated… Partly we did so because we felt “Death in the Desert” had to be out as soon as possible. However, there were a multitude of people who bought the first and third books and then would email asking if there was one missing…they felt they had missed something in jumping from book one to three. So…I acquiesced and we published “Northern Conspiracy. ” Upon reflection, I realized that while the characters become more “human” in this novel, the author’s villains are exceptionally crafty, evil, and devious.. I regretted delaying publication of the book.

So, if you want some good summer reads…the books are available on Amazon and are also available as ebooks. Enjoy!

Remembering Purpose

Does this mean we should not eat meat? NO….well, maybe. Do I? Yes.

It’s so easy to lose focus. Maybe for you it’s not…but I get side-tracked just walking out the door.

Photo by change.org

I finally said,  “Wait a minute! Whoa Nelly!” or something like that. I have fretted over, and tried to support, too many issues:  Southern Resident Orcas; Saving Our Wild Salmon; plastic pollution and conservation; diminishing aquafers; orcas kept in stupid-ass swimming pools (whales belong in oceans, not swimming pools)! Oh, also those horrible trucks hauling sad-looking cows to slaughter. Even worse are the horrible slaughter yards…just sad sad sad. But worse yet, if that’s possible, are monkeys who share over 95% of people’s DNA being used for medical experiments. These animals have feelings exactly like we do.

Granted I have donated money to some organizations that are up and running in terms of finding solutions for nature. For example, the NRDC (Nature Resource Defense Council) is highly successful at stopping outlandish destruction of public lands, and the Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition has a strong stance and support. Ecuador’s GARP project is progressing, and CELDF (Community Environmental Defense Fund) is doing well in helping citizens protect their environments. Basically, these groups are doing fine, with or without my donations. (By the way did you know that Ecuador has adopted the rights of nature into their constitution?)

Photo by John Boyd

As for The Southern Resident Pod of orcas? Depends on what you read…and who writes it. Overall, though, the prognosis is not good.

Ultimately, I finally remembered what all these interests boil down to: THE RIGHTS OF NATURE! I’ve read two books about the Rights of Nature – you’d think I wouldn’t forget about it.

So, my focus is back to square one: I want to defend the Rights of Nature…all nature…and try not to be tarred and feathered by the naysayers. Essentially all animals need to be treated respectfully. Scientists have proved that they feel pain and fear. Does this mean we should not eat meat? NO….well, maybe. Do I? ummm yes. Then there is land and forest destruction…too much.

 I’ve designed a sign to hangon the wall by my desk to keep me focused:   Becky, what are you doing today to promote the Rights of Nature?

This fall we will be publishing (ebook format only for now) a book titled: NO WATER – NO LIFE. That should help!

Publisher to Push for Rights of Nature/Environmental Issues

We don’t have to rely on other nations to fix our own backyard, unlike climate change and plastic pollution require.

After being stalled for two years with the “pandemic,” closures and a growing lack of public interest due to increasing political and social turmoil, Moonlight Mesa unexpectedly ended the JUST ONE THING ALLIANCE program earlier this month. Publisher Becky Coffield announced today the company will instead be spending much more energy on Rights of Nature issues.

JUST ONE THING was an attempt to entice people to give up just one single-use plastic item, thus contributing in a small way to less plastic pollution and waste in garbage dumps, the ocean, beaches, water sources, etc. Small things add up!

“For several years we’ve been somewhat engaged in environmental issues that can actually be ‘fixed’ given time and resources. However, we intend to greatly step up our involvement,” Coffield said.

Some problems are massive and will take time, which in many cases we don’t have (such as doing what we can to help the Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition in restoring the wild salmon runs in the Pacific Northwest that the diminishing pod of Southern Resident Orcas rely on for survival). Other issues can be solved by the brilliant legal work of Nature Resource Defense Council (NRDC) and Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF). And there are issues that simply require public education and awareness. We don’t have to rely on other nations to fix our own backyard, unlike climate change and plastic pollution require.

I can tell you right now that we are excited about this decision. Everyone here has the energy to get actively involved in these issues.

So much to do…so little time. we’ll keep you posted!”

We’re Still Alive!

This lack of action has been going on for years despite Save Our Wild Salmon Alliance’s efforts to have the Lower Snake River Dams removed. The inability to make a tough decision is wasting time…and not helping to restore the salmon runs.

Although it’s been a long time since anyone here has blogged, it’s not because anyone  has had overwhelming misfortunes or the perennial Covid. Instead, we’ve had tax nightmares, knee replacement (my husband), and we are trying to have an orderly first quarter for 2022.

On the bright side,  another baby orca in the Southern Resident Pod has been spotted!

On a semi bright side, talks are still continuing about how to restore the salmon runs in the Pacific Northwest. But as most adults know, talk is just that. Action is what counts. Everybody involved talks the same talk, but not everyone is willing to walk the same walk. This lack of action has been going on for years despite Save Our Wild Salmon Alliance’s efforts to have the Lower Snake River Dams removed. It’s tiring…and shameful. I won’t point fingers at certain individuals since I’m not a resident of Washington State and don’t vote there even though I’m there for months at a time. The inability to make tough decisions is wasting time…and not helping to restore the salmon runs.

On a somewhat  brighter side, however, Washington State has removed some dams and has plans for more, increasing long absent salmon sightings…they just can’t seem to make a final decision about the Lower Snake River Dams. And there’s no doubt it’s a monumental one. Somewhere the buck needs to stop, however… Below is a photo from the Seattle Times of the removal of the Elwha Dam.

That’s all for politics…I don’t want to get started on Washington D.C.

NEW PROJECTS:

Moonlight Mesa will probably be converting Saving Our Oceans and A Beginner’s Guide to Owning a Mule  to ebooks in 2022.

Despite getting off to a good start, it’s an early death

For whatever of the many reasons/excuses  we’ve come up with, Saving Our Oceans  has been a tragic, major flop despite getting off to a great start. First, the title is misleading. It should be Saving Our Water. Maybe I can talk our cover designer, Vin Libassi, into changing that. Second, it’s become obvious that not everyone cares about plastic pollution, water pollution and contaminants, whales, flesh and brain eating bacteria etc. Maybe it’s just too overwhelming and depressing.

A Beginner’s Guide to Owning a Mule has been, hands down, our best-selling title in both 2020 and 2021. However, I had a critical knee jerk reaction when some buyer returned 99 copies of the book (out of an order of 156.) We’ve had a few books here and there returned, but 99 books cost us upward of $900 in return fees. Ingram charges $2.00 a book for returns plus we had to pay for the printing, etc. So, in my hysteria, I all but eliminated the discount and took the book off  the “return” category. Naturally sales have plummeted. I may try one more time to give it a higher discount and make it returnable. But that hurt…bad. And I’m now a bit leery. I also have 99 copies of the book to personally sell.

Now that “someone” has seen to it that fuel prices are skyrocketing, it appears that our summer plans are dead in the water. With fuel prices for diesel already hovering around $6 to $7 a gallon in Canada (and who knows what they’ll be come June) we need to reassess the plans and speaking engagements we’d been working on arranging in Canada and Alaska. We’d hoped to donate some 500 copies of Saving Our Oceans to libraries and schools – that plan is now on an indefinite hold. I’d also planned to chart all whale sitings while en route with photos and stats.

FINALLY: I’ll be posting a photo soon of  Tippy Canoe, my new “rowing canoe.” Because my skiff is so darn heavy, it’s almost impossible for us to set it on deck on our boat. But Tippy Canoe only weighs about 65 pounds (and that’s even with the carved, varnished row wings and shoe done by my husband.) The boat is quick to respond and super light so it FLYS. My skiff kind of crawled, but I loved it. Still do. Heavier than heck, though.

If you can’t say anything nice…Here are two book reviews you’ll love if you’re into hiking and adventure…or not.

I love rocks and am constantly stealing them, by the way. Although, in my defense I’ll just say that before I take one I always ask (silently) if the rock wants to go with me or not. Sometimes I get a strong feeling that the rock expresses NO.

It’s been difficult to blog lately. There is so much negativity floating around on television, talk radio, and on the web that it’s hard to remain “unpolitical.” I’m a small publisher -not a big politician.

So, we won’t talk about the “China Virus”, vaccines, boosters or mandates. We won’t talk about the government or any decisions that come out of Washington. We won’t talk about the rampant crime…or my extremely high cholesterol that I am ignoring. So the following should be uplifting…

I definitely enjoy promoting my authors and haven’t done so for a long spell. So over the course of the next few months I’ll be introducing readers to some amazing, interesting, unique people. I’m excited to start on this brag-a-thon!

However, before I launch my authors I do want to mention another author…one I didn’t publish, but one that I have found to be so inspiring that I’ve now read two of his books and have started a third.

Meet Colin Fletcher, author of many unbelievable adventures! The first book of his that I read was The Man Who Walked Through Time, and it was an incredible account of Colin’s walk from one end of the Grand Canyon Park to the other…279 miles…alone. He was the first person to do this, and for all I know the last to do so. I have to say that a big takeaway is that this book made me wish I had majored in Geology. I love rocks and am constantly stealing them, by the way. Although, in my defense I’ll just say that before I take one I always ask (silently) if the rock wants to go with me or not. Sometimes I get a strong feeling that the rock expresses NO. Other times it’s willing to go with me. Rocks actually are alive, by the way…they have cells. Slow moving ones. Anyway, Colin’s knowledge of the geography and the millions of years it took for the formation of the canyon is incredible. It was almost impossible for me to really grasp the time …we’re talking millions upon millions and more millions of years.

Hiking in windy Wickenburg Arizona

The last pages of the book brought it all together. He’d completed the journey, but what was the point of it all? What he said was absolutely perfect…that’s the best I can say. It was stunning.

The second book was The Thousand Mile Summer, and this journey actually took place before the canyon trek. Colin walked from Mexico to the Oregon border long before there was a Pacific Crest Trail, and long before that eastern part of California was developed the way it is today. His journey was fascinating and it was one that I felt was doable…that is if I wanted to carry a heavy pack and sleep on the ground. Which I don’t want to. I’d surely try it if someone would carry my pack and there were bed and breakfast places along the way. Nevertheless, the book was very inspiring and I do intend on doing much more hiking! Fletcher has a keen, artistic knack for describing everything, and it seems he is always in the NOW. He is incredibly observant and always PRESENT. I’m jealous of this! I need to get my brains to shut-up and stop wandering about.

I recently started The Secret Worlds of Colin Fletcher but left it in Arizona when we departed for Anacortes. I’ll get back to it when we return in two weeks. I hope to snowshoe a great deal of that distance…well, maybe a few miles.

Hiking in Anacortes, WA

The Rights of Nature – A Global Movement We Can All Join

In the U.S., the Ridgway town council in Colorado has approved a resolution to recognize the rights of the Uncompahgre River.

The movement of the Rights of Nature is gaining momentum! The following information is from GARN’s recent newsletter (Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature). In addition to the victory of nature in Los Cedros in Ecuador, there is growing action around the world.

“On Antarctica Day, Dec 1st, a webinar was held to share a draft Declaration for the Rights of Antarctica, with plans to launch the final Declaration on Earth Day, 22 April 2022, for the adoption by States and International Organizations.”

And from Belgium comes this news:

Belgium, the first to demand recognition of the crime of ecocide
­The resolution was adopted in the plenary with the aim to recognize the crime of ecocide in international criminal law. The Belgian Parliament becomes the first in Europe to ask for such recognition.
Photo by NRDC.ORG

Both Ireland and the U.S. are on the bandwagon too:

Rights of Nature recognition in local councils in US and Ireland 
­In the US, the Ridgway town council in Colorado has approved a resolution to recognize the rights of the Uncompahgre River. Meanwhile, Donegal County Council is the first local authority in Ireland to consider a Rights of Nature motion.

And in Spain, young people are taking the lead:

Young people in Spain unite to recognize the rights of Mar Menor
­Young people from all over Spain are taking a petition to recognize the rights of Mar Menor to the Congress. More than 639,000 thousand signatures have been presented.

The Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition in Seattle, Washington, a favorite organization, is a “local” example of protecting the rights of nature, in this case the wild salmon of the Pacific Northwest. Led by Joseph Bogaard, this coalition has worked endlessly to preserve the wild salmon runs that are all but extinguished due to dams along the Lower Snake River and Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River in Oregon. (I need to add that Washington State has been taking dams down and seeing a great return of fish to the rivers.)

Over-fishing has contributed to the salmon depletion also. Remember that these salmon embark on a four-year journey around the Pacific Ocean when they leave the river of their birth. It is well-known that Asian fisheries using nets take everything they encounter. In addition, some people blame global warming with the resultant warming rivers as a contributing cause for their depletion. Few want to admit, however, that the proliferation of seals has taken its toll also. And without salmon, the treasured Southern Resident Pod of Orcas will likely die off.

Want to learn more? Go to youtube and see the 50 minute film:

The Rights of Nature: A Global Movement – Feature Documentary

Keep in mind that if nature dies, we all die. If we die, nature will flourish. So who needs who?