Join the Celebration June 8

downloadOn June 8, a segment of the world’s population will be celebrating World Ocean Day. In many locations the entire month of June is dedicated to the ocean. World Ocean Month recognizes and acknowledges the people striving to protect the ocean and marine life. Are you one of these people?  You don’t need to live in a coastal region to celebrate this wonderful day.

NOAA gives good reasons why we need to take care of our ocean. (There is actually only ONE ocean, but it is divided into geographical areas so it sounds like there’s more than one.)

For starters, NOAA says the following:

The air we breathe: the ocean produces over half of the world’s oxygen and absorbs 50 times more carbon dioxide than our atmosphere. Climate regulation: covering 70% of the Earth’s surface, the ocean transports heat from the equator to the poles, regulating our climate and weather patterns. Transportation: 76% of all U.S. trade involves some form of marine transportation. Recreation: From fishing to boating to kayaking and whale watching, the ocean provides us with many unique activities. Economic benefitsthe U.S. ocean economy produces $282 billion in goods and services and ocean-dependent businesses employ almost three million people. Food: the ocean provides more than just seafood; ingredients from the sea are found in surprising foods such as peanut butter and soymilk. Medicine: many medicinal products come from the ocean, including ingredients that help fight cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, and heart disease.

I think this is plenty of reason in itself why the ocean deserves a special day to be celebrated. The oxygen part certainly gets my attention!

 

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Now available

June 8, Ocean Celebration Day, is one of the reasons we drove ourselves cranky and crazy trying to get Saving Our Oceans into print when we did. We wanted it to be available as part of the celebration…and perhaps to help people understand why the ocean and its inhabitants are in such a perilous state.

Ocean problems cannot be solved by beach clean-ups, no matter how noble the effort. Unless the pollution itself is stopped, the ocean will die. Simply put, when the ocean dies, we die.

So, you may not live near the ocean, but you can celebrate this day anyway. One way to do this is to resolve to stop one habit that contributes to ocean pollution. Even if you live in the middle of Kansas, or the heart of Africa, remember that plastic travels down streams and rivers and through the air. Every lake in the world has evidence of plastic pollution. Sewage, fertilizers, and garbage tossed about carelessly (and off Carnival Cruise Lines) all contribute.

And, most important of all, you can buy a copy of Saving Our Oceans. You’ll be shocked at what you read. Saving Our Oceans is available on Amazon and can also be ordered through any book dealer.

If everyone adopts just one habit, makes one change, we could literally see an ocean of difference.

Are Oil Producers Feeling Some Heat?

According to “Investors Pressure Oil Giants on Ocean Plastics Pollution,” by David Hasemyer (Inside Climate News)  oil magnets are beginning to feel some heat for the plastic waste they continue to create – and that “heat” also refers to climate change heat the oil industry is primarily responsible for.

Savvy “environmentally friendly” oil investors are beginning to focus on the plastic disaster created by oil producers. The disaster not only includes the mountains of plastic covering landfills, but also the plastic pollution that now kills over 1,000,000 sea birds a year, untold turtles, and countless other sea inhabitants including whales. But the damage goes further: it’s now recognized that microscopic plastic pieces are blown through the air, infecting the food we eat and the air we breathe. This should come as no surprise, though.

“Conrad Mackerron, senior vice president of As You Sow…said he was prepared for a stiff fight when his organization filed plastics-related shareholder resolutions this year with Exxon, Chevron, Phillips 66 and chemical giant DowDuPont,” according to Hasemyer’s article.

Ah! Typical move, though, when the oil producers “agreed to address the plastics issue in exchange for the investors withdrawing their formal resolutions.” Is this just another delay tactic? It’s a tactic other plastic producers are accused of using: Coca Cola, PepsiCo, etc.  Everybody is always “working on it.” Nothing seems to get done, however, but a lot of lip service. We are talking about both “gas” and “oil” producers.

One of the major issues is the ubiquitous spread of “nurdles.” Captain Charles Moore, in Plastic Ocean studied not just the large, visible plastic in the Pacific gyre, but also documented the presence of billions upon billions of nurdles in the water – the very tiny plastic items that  are used to make plastic products. These nurdles are consumed by fish, fowl, and mammals…and that indirectly includes people.

It’s a fact that plastic production is responsible for a large amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Fracking, the act of destroying the earth and copious amounts of fresh water to extract gas from the earth, releases methane into the atmosphere. (So it’s not just cow farts that create methane gas, folks.)

Then any leaks along the trip to the destination account for more methane leakage. Finally, the manufacture of plastic feedstock creates even more methane leakage.

“The whole refining process is very greenhouse gas intensive…from the gas fields to the production end there is a huge carbon footprint to plastics,” explained Lisa Holzman, energy program manager for As You Sow. The methane release is just one of the problems with fracking – toxic fresh water pollution is as bad as the methane release. Gas, like oil, is a fossil fuel.

Water Pollution from Fracking
Photo compliments of Fractracker.org

Boycotting and banning plastic bags, bottles and straws are excellent, effective first-steps that consumers can easily take to send the message that they are fed up with the wanton trashing of the world by big oil and big chemical producing companies.