Not very successful…but not stressed

And I finished my third Colin Fletcher book, The Secret Worlds of Colin Fletcher. I am a bit sad that I can’t carry a 60 pound backpack and walk for 20 miles a day. Seriously. Anymore I can’t find a pair of shoes that work for me, and I’ve got a closet full of them!

At this point, despite my good intentions, I’d have to say I’ve not been very successful this summer with my lofty, well intentioned goals and ideas. It’s weird because I don’t really care.

For starters, I couldn’t resist reading the Fox and NYT apps on my cell phone almost every day despite my firm commitment not to do so. It’s such a bad habit. In some ways it was depressing to see that things weren’t changing for the better…but it was even more depressing to see change for the worse. I refer primarily to the free-for-all shootings, both here and in Ukraine. Not that I’m gun free. And hysteria and hatred were at an all time high, in the media anyway.

But I’ve read some great books! For starters, Stay off my Operating Table, written by heart surgeon Philip Ovadia, was most interesting, especially his steak diet – that won’t work for my budget. But perhaps even more interesting and helpful was A Statin free Life, by Dr. Aseem Malhotra, a highly respected cardiologist. I loved this guy’s diet advice. SOO DOABLE! And finally I read Live it not Diet, by Mike Sheridean. This book was a bit too restrictive for me for the long haul, but it was worthwhile reading. I tried his diet plan for a week, but I was sabotaged by my husband when he made his own recipe of coconut oatmeal cookies. I got into these books because the quack doctor I’ve seen twice now tried to insist I go on statins. I refused. I’m looking for a doctor now who agrees with me.

I also read the rivoting The Hidden Life of Trees, by Peter Wohlleben. If you think I’m being sarcastic, I’m not. I will admit, though, that I could only read one chapter at a time because I really found it necessary to actually go look at trees after each chapter to really see and experience what he was talking about. Fascinating! Trees are amazing when you know how smart they are!

Resting on a 5-mile hike

And I finished my third Colin Fletcher book, The Secret Worlds of Colin Fletcher. I am a bit sad that I can’t carry a 60 pound backpack and walk for 20 miles a day. Seriously. Anymore I can’t find a pair of shoes that work for me, and I’ve got a closet full of them!

And I read some great John Sandford books and some gory murder/detective books. That was fun.

But, I just can’t get into the meditation stuff. Every time I try to meditate I fall asleep.

As for the business…it’s languished. I have been giving out the Saving Our Oceans book, however. Sometimes I leave a copy in those swap boxes. I have had some book orders which is always a challenge when I’m on a boat.

As for the cruising world where I currently am…very very few boats out and about. In the 40 years we’ve been boating, I’ve never seen so few vessels. In some ways it was really nice…in other ways it was kind of eerie to travel all day and not see another boat! Fuel is the big issue obviously. Anyway, we’ll be going into drydock August 10th and will be back in Arizona in early September. I’ll be happy to be home, no matter how hot it is in Arizona.

The author of “the old lady” book assures me it’s almost finished. She says she has completely changed the plot, but is much happier with it. I’d just be happy to see it after waiting almost three years. I’m suspicious at this point.

No updates on orcas other than a few orca babies have been born this year. Salmon are still waiting in limbo for someone to get the kahunas to tear down dams so they don’t become extinct. No one believes in the rights of nature, I guess. And some very stupid people still think that whales belong in swimming pools.

Stay free…free from covid, monkey pox and things that scare you.

Publisher to Push for Rights of Nature/Environmental Issues

We don’t have to rely on other nations to fix our own backyard, unlike climate change and plastic pollution require.

After being stalled for two years with the “pandemic,” closures and a growing lack of public interest due to increasing political and social turmoil, Moonlight Mesa unexpectedly ended the JUST ONE THING ALLIANCE program earlier this month. Publisher Becky Coffield announced today the company will instead be spending much more energy on Rights of Nature issues.

JUST ONE THING was an attempt to entice people to give up just one single-use plastic item, thus contributing in a small way to less plastic pollution and waste in garbage dumps, the ocean, beaches, water sources, etc. Small things add up!

“For several years we’ve been somewhat engaged in environmental issues that can actually be ‘fixed’ given time and resources. However, we intend to greatly step up our involvement,” Coffield said.

Some problems are massive and will take time, which in many cases we don’t have (such as doing what we can to help the Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition in restoring the wild salmon runs in the Pacific Northwest that the diminishing pod of Southern Resident Orcas rely on for survival). Other issues can be solved by the brilliant legal work of Nature Resource Defense Council (NRDC) and Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF). And there are issues that simply require public education and awareness. We don’t have to rely on other nations to fix our own backyard, unlike climate change and plastic pollution require.

I can tell you right now that we are excited about this decision. Everyone here has the energy to get actively involved in these issues.

So much to do…so little time. we’ll keep you posted!”

If you can’t say anything nice…Here are two book reviews you’ll love if you’re into hiking and adventure…or not.

I love rocks and am constantly stealing them, by the way. Although, in my defense I’ll just say that before I take one I always ask (silently) if the rock wants to go with me or not. Sometimes I get a strong feeling that the rock expresses NO.

It’s been difficult to blog lately. There is so much negativity floating around on television, talk radio, and on the web that it’s hard to remain “unpolitical.” I’m a small publisher -not a big politician.

So, we won’t talk about the “China Virus”, vaccines, boosters or mandates. We won’t talk about the government or any decisions that come out of Washington. We won’t talk about the rampant crime…or my extremely high cholesterol that I am ignoring. So the following should be uplifting…

I definitely enjoy promoting my authors and haven’t done so for a long spell. So over the course of the next few months I’ll be introducing readers to some amazing, interesting, unique people. I’m excited to start on this brag-a-thon!

However, before I launch my authors I do want to mention another author…one I didn’t publish, but one that I have found to be so inspiring that I’ve now read two of his books and have started a third.

Meet Colin Fletcher, author of many unbelievable adventures! The first book of his that I read was The Man Who Walked Through Time, and it was an incredible account of Colin’s walk from one end of the Grand Canyon Park to the other…279 miles…alone. He was the first person to do this, and for all I know the last to do so. I have to say that a big takeaway is that this book made me wish I had majored in Geology. I love rocks and am constantly stealing them, by the way. Although, in my defense I’ll just say that before I take one I always ask (silently) if the rock wants to go with me or not. Sometimes I get a strong feeling that the rock expresses NO. Other times it’s willing to go with me. Rocks actually are alive, by the way…they have cells. Slow moving ones. Anyway, Colin’s knowledge of the geography and the millions of years it took for the formation of the canyon is incredible. It was almost impossible for me to really grasp the time …we’re talking millions upon millions and more millions of years.

Hiking in windy Wickenburg Arizona

The last pages of the book brought it all together. He’d completed the journey, but what was the point of it all? What he said was absolutely perfect…that’s the best I can say. It was stunning.

The second book was The Thousand Mile Summer, and this journey actually took place before the canyon trek. Colin walked from Mexico to the Oregon border long before there was a Pacific Crest Trail, and long before that eastern part of California was developed the way it is today. His journey was fascinating and it was one that I felt was doable…that is if I wanted to carry a heavy pack and sleep on the ground. Which I don’t want to. I’d surely try it if someone would carry my pack and there were bed and breakfast places along the way. Nevertheless, the book was very inspiring and I do intend on doing much more hiking! Fletcher has a keen, artistic knack for describing everything, and it seems he is always in the NOW. He is incredibly observant and always PRESENT. I’m jealous of this! I need to get my brains to shut-up and stop wandering about.

I recently started The Secret Worlds of Colin Fletcher but left it in Arizona when we departed for Anacortes. I’ll get back to it when we return in two weeks. I hope to snowshoe a great deal of that distance…well, maybe a few miles.

Hiking in Anacortes, WA

The Rights of Nature – A Global Movement We Can All Join

In the U.S., the Ridgway town council in Colorado has approved a resolution to recognize the rights of the Uncompahgre River.

The movement of the Rights of Nature is gaining momentum! The following information is from GARN’s recent newsletter (Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature). In addition to the victory of nature in Los Cedros in Ecuador, there is growing action around the world.

“On Antarctica Day, Dec 1st, a webinar was held to share a draft Declaration for the Rights of Antarctica, with plans to launch the final Declaration on Earth Day, 22 April 2022, for the adoption by States and International Organizations.”

And from Belgium comes this news:

Belgium, the first to demand recognition of the crime of ecocide
­The resolution was adopted in the plenary with the aim to recognize the crime of ecocide in international criminal law. The Belgian Parliament becomes the first in Europe to ask for such recognition.
Photo by NRDC.ORG

Both Ireland and the U.S. are on the bandwagon too:

Rights of Nature recognition in local councils in US and Ireland 
­In the US, the Ridgway town council in Colorado has approved a resolution to recognize the rights of the Uncompahgre River. Meanwhile, Donegal County Council is the first local authority in Ireland to consider a Rights of Nature motion.

And in Spain, young people are taking the lead:

Young people in Spain unite to recognize the rights of Mar Menor
­Young people from all over Spain are taking a petition to recognize the rights of Mar Menor to the Congress. More than 639,000 thousand signatures have been presented.

The Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition in Seattle, Washington, a favorite organization, is a “local” example of protecting the rights of nature, in this case the wild salmon of the Pacific Northwest. Led by Joseph Bogaard, this coalition has worked endlessly to preserve the wild salmon runs that are all but extinguished due to dams along the Lower Snake River and Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River in Oregon. (I need to add that Washington State has been taking dams down and seeing a great return of fish to the rivers.)

Over-fishing has contributed to the salmon depletion also. Remember that these salmon embark on a four-year journey around the Pacific Ocean when they leave the river of their birth. It is well-known that Asian fisheries using nets take everything they encounter. In addition, some people blame global warming with the resultant warming rivers as a contributing cause for their depletion. Few want to admit, however, that the proliferation of seals has taken its toll also. And without salmon, the treasured Southern Resident Pod of Orcas will likely die off.

Want to learn more? Go to youtube and see the 50 minute film:

The Rights of Nature: A Global Movement – Feature Documentary

Keep in mind that if nature dies, we all die. If we die, nature will flourish. So who needs who?

The Rights of Nature Needs Us. Act Now.

Without Nature, quite frankly, we wouldn’t last very long. Without us, however, Nature would flourish.

Congratulations to the tiny country of Ecuador, the only country in the world that has formally adopted the Rights of Nature into their constitution. Although there are other nations that honor the Rights of Nature…usually when it’s convenient…Ecuador stands alone as the only country that has stood by their decision

So, what exactly do we mean by the Rights of Nature? I think most people probably have a good idea, but there is some confusion too. Personally I think of the Rights of Nature as respect for creatures and the natural world. We should not behave as if nature is there for our exclusive use and disposal. We should never destroy the natural world for economic advancement or personal egocentric wants.

But a good example of the Rights of Nature is the most recent decision made by the Ecuadorian court, as reported by GARN (Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature).

“In an unprecedented case, the Constitutional Court of Ecuador used the constitutional provision on the “Rights of Nature” to safeguard Los Cedros protected forest from mining concessions. The Court voted 7 in favor and 2 abstentions. With the ruling, the Constitutional Court has created groundbreaking jurisprudence in which the Rights of Nature – the right to a healthy environment, the right to water, and environmental consultation – must be respected. The court decided that activities that threaten the Rights of Nature should not be carried out within the Los Cedros Protected Forest ecosystem, which includes mining and all types of extractive activities. Water and environmental permits to mining companies must also be denied.”

GARN is an organization that I’ve written about before. Anyone can join GARN. Their website is garn.org.

There are actually seven countries that legally recognize the rights of nature, and surprisingly the United States is one of them (although that can be pretty hard to believe, I do think we are doing better.) For example, CELDF (Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund) is an organization that is extremely helpful in helping communities press lawsuits against invading corporate pillagers and other organizations wanting to do environmental damage that local communities object to.

Bristol Bay must be preserved. Mining and drilling do not belong here.

The NRDC (Nature Resource Defense Council) is an organization that takes offensive companies and their pending plans to court to stop projects that are destructive to the environment. A recent example is their stopping the hideous plan to do intensive mining in the pristine Bristol Bay in Alaska. Bristol Bay is one of the most pristine, natural wildlife/seal life areas in the world. Of course, the Canadian company wanting the property is filing yet more suits.

Oil spills have destroyed millions of fish, animals and habitat

The very latest endeavor NRDC has undertaken is to stop the dangerous 1,000,000 acres of offshore drilling oil and gas lease sales in Alaska by the Biden administration. Oil spills in Alaska have killed millions of fish, whales and other creatures and destroyed entire ecosystems needed for survival. I’m not sure how leasing a million acres of Alaska coastal waters for oil drilling supports this administrations preaching about “climate change.”

We have one earth…our home. We have treated animals and the environment as though they are under our dominion and rule. We have too often shamefully and wantonly waged war on nature’s resources without a thought of the devastation often caused. Nature has every right to exist on this planet equal to the rights of people…Without nature, quite frankly, we wouldn’t last very long. Without us, however, Nature would flourish.

Want a free copy of this book? The first five people to contact me will receive a free copy. (U.S. address only)

Rampageous Abuse of Animals

Ask yourself: would you prefer to be boiled alive or be dead first before being tossed in the pot.

The Rights of Nature must be acknowledged – It’s not that complicated

Just when I started believing that animals were no longer being used for medical and military experiments, I was shocked to find that 75 pharmaceutical companies are currently using animals to test various Covid 19 medications/vaccines. SEVENTY-FIVE, and that’s the ones we know about. This form of animal abuse needs to be stopped once and for all. Most of the vaccines and medications they test on animals intended for use on people usually don’t even work on animals.

No living creature should be forced to participate in scientific experimentation.  This is not Nazi Germany…yet. (Medical experimentation on unknowing victims has, unfortunately, happened in this country which may well account for the reluctance to trust the government and medical professions.) And no person should be forced to be vaccinated against their will, or be threatened for refusing.

Science has very strong evidence that all “creatures” are sentient beings, yet continues experimentation. We are very closely related to other mammals. Humans and mice share nearly 90% of human DNA. Think that’s a lot? Humans and chimpanzees share 98.8% of DNA, and humans and Gorillas share 98.4% of their DNA.  That’s CLOSE! We even share DNA with fruit flies who, by the way, also are partially sentient.

Now it is strongly believed that these sentient qualities even extend to crabs, lobsters, shrimp, prawns, octopuse, and squids.

Indeed, boiling live crustaceans is illegal in some countries, primarily Switzerland and New Zealand at this time. Ask yourself: would you prefer to be boiled alive or be dead first before being tossed in the pot.

Ironically, the Rights of Nature laws exist in about 17 countries. Ecuador adopted the Rights of Nature into their constitution. In the U.S., dozens of cities and counties have some form of Rights of Nature in their laws, codes, etc. protecting the environment and animals. CELDF (Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund) is an organization that helps communities defend themselves against harmful organizations. NRDC (Nature Resource Defense Council) is another organization trying to protect valuable habitat and animals. It’s still not enough.

Wild Law – A Manifesto for Earth Justice, by Cormac Cullinan, explores “earth and nature” issues, including the abuse and destruction of both. Basically his argument is that far too many people (which includes corporations and governments) connect poorly, if at all, with the rest of life on earth.

Let’s stop treating animals and nature like they are simply there for our use and disposal.

Time to Decide: Money or Nature?

If developed, the Pebble Mine would produce 10 billion tons of mining waste that would threaten communities and ecosystems, and it would increase the climate crisis by emitting millions of tons of greenhouse gases.

Recently (September 11)  an article appeared in the Google list of weird articles that definitely was an attention-getter for those concerned about the Rights of Nature, the environment, and species extinction.

The article was entitled, “U.S. must not let China stop Pebble Mine that has rare earths we need.”

The Pebble Mine has been under siege by the NRDC (Natural Resource Defense Council), Alaskan native groups, and environmental groups in general, and now China. The proposed mine site is in Alaska’s Bristol Bay.

This long drawn-out legal battle basically is an attempt by NRDC, environmentalists, and native groups to stop the development of a mine that will completely devastate the Bristol Bay wilderness, renowned for salmon runs and wildlife as well as Native communities. It’s estimated that the planned toxic gold and copper mega-mine will produce billions of tons of mining waste and will have a devastating impact on the people, water, fisheries, and wildlife.

Photo by orvis.com

Despite pressure from President Trump’s administration, the pressure from the public and the NRDC proved to be too much for the Army Corps of Engineers, and they rejected the mining plan  because it posed “unavoidable adverse impacts” to the water and marine life of Bristol Bay, one of the nation’s last, truly wild places. (Despite the author claiming that Bristol Bay is a desolate location, plenty of photos say otherwise.)

Photo by glampinghub.com

However, the developers have 90 days to make changes…and they will. If developed, the Pebble Mine would produce 10 billion tons of mining waste that would threaten communities and ecosystems, and it would increase the climate crisis by emitting millions of tons of greenhouse gases.

So where does China come in? The Chinese are working in their own insidious, under-handed way to ensure that the Pebble Mine project does not move forward. Why? Currently, China has a virtual monopoly on rare earth minerals, and it has been discovered that the Pebble Mine could produce minerals that are essential for the production of “many military and high tech items.”

The author of the Google article subtly implies his disdain for environmentalists who appear to be on the same team as those communist Chinese. He fails to recognize that the big losers in this ongoing mining drama are the American people, and fish, animals, and nature. Who wins: corporations greedy for the money they will make from the minerals that are essential for the production of many military and high tech items. Do we really need even more weapons of mass destruction and high tech items? Perhaps we would really benefit from more NATURE!

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A word about the NRDC. If you are environmentally inclined please consider membership in the NRDC. It is not expensive, and this organization takes on environmental destruction in the courtroom. They are very successful in stopping an inordinate amount of assaults on our environment, from the “Dirty Water Rule” to the effort to allow industrial take-over and pollution of our national parks and nature preserves by drilling, fracking, mining, and hunting.

Check out NRDC.org and learn more about their incredible efforts and victories in fighting against the industrial poisoning of people, animals, and nature.

JUST ONE THING

It’s a minority of individuals who have any sense of stewardship about anything involving nature and animals. Some people are concerned with a specific animal – for example “Save the Whales” – which is perfectly fine. Some are concerned about all animals and nature – for example Green Peace. But we’re talking a very small number of people when it comes down to it.

One problem that those involved with saving animals or nature must dealoiled bird with is that  they’re regularly scoffed at as extremists, tree-huggers, radicals,  hippies,  environmentalists (heaven forbid) and other invectives, and often they must battle big business and corporations. I think it’s safe to say that a majority of people don’t give a thought to a species of any kind becoming extinct and might not even care if someone planted the thought.

whale-postcard3127275067734833074.jpgThis realization really hit home when I sent out an email to a group of 70 people, most of whom I know fairly well. Some I’ve known for years. I asked that they consider supporting the publication of Saving Our Oceans since the net proceeds from the sale of the book were being donated to several 501c3 organizations. Many of the 70 live in California, and California does have a healthy history of protecting their coastline and marine sanctuaries.

Get ready for the big response! Ready? One person out of 70 said they’d be delighted to buy the book. That is .02 per cent.

One woman asked me to remove her from my email list.

Well, it’s very possible it could simply be me.

However, I have found only one individual in the tiny town where I live who cares one whit about the health of the ocean, the captivity of orcas, Japanese whaling, or any similar environmental topic.

It’s NOT okay for 1,000,000 species of plants and animals to die off. It is NOT acceptable to be harpooning the smartest mammals in the ocean (possible smarter than people in some regards) or holding them prisoners in swimming pools for entertainment. It’s not acceptable for big business to rape, pillage, and pollute the earth. There seems to be a robust “leave it for others to fix” attitude. Or is the real reason behind inaction and ambivalence that the problems seem overwhelming and hopeless?

Seaworld's Orca Swimming Pool
Photo by change.org

Yes, for the most part we all have extremely busy, stressful lives, but the solution might be simpler than people realize. Imagine this: What if everyone, every single person, did something helpful. Just one thing. I think we can all afford to do JUST ONE THING.

bottles

Start by saying NO to PLASTIC Bags, Bottles and Straws. One thing.