The Rights of Nature – A Global Movement We Can All Join

In the U.S., the Ridgway town council in Colorado has approved a resolution to recognize the rights of the Uncompahgre River.

The movement of the Rights of Nature is gaining momentum! The following information is from GARN’s recent newsletter (Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature). In addition to the victory of nature in Los Cedros in Ecuador, there is growing action around the world.

“On Antarctica Day, Dec 1st, a webinar was held to share a draft Declaration for the Rights of Antarctica, with plans to launch the final Declaration on Earth Day, 22 April 2022, for the adoption by States and International Organizations.”

And from Belgium comes this news:

Belgium, the first to demand recognition of the crime of ecocide
­The resolution was adopted in the plenary with the aim to recognize the crime of ecocide in international criminal law. The Belgian Parliament becomes the first in Europe to ask for such recognition.
Photo by NRDC.ORG

Both Ireland and the U.S. are on the bandwagon too:

Rights of Nature recognition in local councils in US and Ireland 
­In the US, the Ridgway town council in Colorado has approved a resolution to recognize the rights of the Uncompahgre River. Meanwhile, Donegal County Council is the first local authority in Ireland to consider a Rights of Nature motion.

And in Spain, young people are taking the lead:

Young people in Spain unite to recognize the rights of Mar Menor
­Young people from all over Spain are taking a petition to recognize the rights of Mar Menor to the Congress. More than 639,000 thousand signatures have been presented.

The Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition in Seattle, Washington, a favorite organization, is a “local” example of protecting the rights of nature, in this case the wild salmon of the Pacific Northwest. Led by Joseph Bogaard, this coalition has worked endlessly to preserve the wild salmon runs that are all but extinguished due to dams along the Lower Snake River and Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River in Oregon. (I need to add that Washington State has been taking dams down and seeing a great return of fish to the rivers.)

Over-fishing has contributed to the salmon depletion also. Remember that these salmon embark on a four-year journey around the Pacific Ocean when they leave the river of their birth. It is well-known that Asian fisheries using nets take everything they encounter. In addition, some people blame global warming with the resultant warming rivers as a contributing cause for their depletion. Few want to admit, however, that the proliferation of seals has taken its toll also. And without salmon, the treasured Southern Resident Pod of Orcas will likely die off.

Want to learn more? Go to youtube and see the 50 minute film:

The Rights of Nature: A Global Movement – Feature Documentary

Keep in mind that if nature dies, we all die. If we die, nature will flourish. So who needs who?

Author: Moonlight Mesa Associates

Publisher who loves Westerns, Whales, and Oceans! Email us at cookie@westernswhalesandoceans.com and orders@moonlightmesaassociates.com

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